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Any advice for Low Fodmap diet?

I am about to start the LowFodmap diet. I have researched on line but can anyone give advice. There are so many apps now - has anyone found them helpful? Is just relying on a a food chart and keeping a paper diary just as good?
I would appreciate any tips.
Thanks. Sarah

  1. Hi Sarah, I personally did the Low FODMAP diet by myself with a random app that I downloaded and it worked fine. I believe the Monash University has an app, too: https://www.monashfodmap.com/ibs-central/i-have-ibs/get-the-app/. However, it might also be helpful to see a dietitian for that, if that's a possibility for you.
    For me personally, the Low FODMAP diet helped a lot at first, but I did the elimination phase for far too long because I was so scared to reintroduce anything. Having a dietitian would have been helpful to avoid living on white rice and chicken for 2 years.
    One thing I would recommend is reading this article about how long it takes for FODMAPs to cause symptoms: https://irritablebowelsyndrome.net/living/fodmaps-trigger-ibs-symptoms
    I hope this helps and that other community members will share their advice and recommendations with you. Hugs, Karina (team member)

    1. The Monash University is the go-to site for good advice.

      I didn't use any apps. I don't access the internet via my phone, but a laptop and apps for smartphones won't load for me. No issue. I'm happy about that. So my way through the 8 week Low Fodmap trial, and the re-introduction phase was done with good old fashioned pen and paper, a food diary, symptom diary, a graph, etc!
      I must say, trying the Low Fodmap diet was definitely worth it. Did it solve my IBS issues? No.
      I found that some low Fodmap foods didn't agree with me from day one. Some high Fodmaps did. To cut a long story short it was worth trying, but my IBS didn't behave logically at all in response to it, Whether low Fodmap or not, my IBS just kept on doing its own thing, so really the results weren't as clear as I'd hoped for.

      But nevertheless I stuck to Low Fodmap for the full 8 weeks and even went gluten free (even though gluten causes me no problems.)

      However, the diet worked beautifully for a friend of mine who also had IBS.
      We are all so different, with umpteen triggers for our symptoms, and umpteen ways to cope with that and even hopefully -heal.

      It was a LOT of research because I also added a deep study of nutrition. I had to, as no dietician was available (I did all this during the UK "Lockdown" in 2020 when it was difficult to get a doctor's appointment, never mind a dietician on the NHS!

      So I pulled out all the stops, and did the work myself. I also took vitamin and mineral supplements at RDA dosage to help me through so there would be no basic deficiencies.

      Your very best plan would be to see if you can get a dietician to help you navigate the Fodmap diet and re-introduction. It would be much more helpful that way if possible.

      1. Thank you so much for taking the time to reply. That is very helpful. From internet research there is so much information but it is business driven so help from a real sufferer is invaluable. I hope you find your solution. X

        1. Have tried it and was not successful

          1. I'm sorry that the Low FODMAP diet didn't work for you. You're not alone.
            We have this article about possible reasons why the diet might not have worked, and what else might be causing you IBS: https://irritablebowelsyndrome.net/living/low-fodmap-diet-fail. You could also try the advice detailed in this article: https://irritablebowelsyndrome.net/living/when-fodmaps-doesnt-help for those who had no success with the Low FODMAP diet.
            I hope this helps.
            Karina (team member)

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