alt=hand holding a probiotic tablet

Building My IBS Regimen, Part 1

I often compare my IBS journey to the stages of grief. Whether I’m mourning my loss of food options, or bargaining with my body’s lack of digestion prowess, I often find myself at a loss. How do I handle my IBS? What are the best supplements to get me, comfortably, through a meal? With that all said, and the looming reality of a reopening society and lowering of COVID protocols, my life is changing before me. The luxuries of my quarantine and coming to an end.

I’ve gotten so used to living a very sedentary life. This past year has allowed/forced me to stay at home, where it’s safe. On one hand, I’m constantly denied the pleasures of human interaction. On the other, I get unlimited access to the most comfortable toilet on the planet; my own. I’ve gotten so accustomed to waking up and eating whatever tickles my fancy, simply just pushing through the discomfort with blissful ignorance knowing that I had a way out. A toilet all my own. My commode would be there for me, as a tender tushy companion.

It’s coming to a pass

After recently moving to Long Island, with NYC at my doorstep, I knew a big change was coming. If I’m to explore the real big adult world, with all these new possibilities at my fingertips, I want a supplement of medications to aid me in my venture into the wild.

Disclaimer: These options are my own and before you make any medical choices you should consult with your primary doctor or gastroenterologist before making any medical decision. What may work for me may not work for you. Hell, some things haven’t even been working for me! But these are my rationales and methodologies for irritable bowel preparedness.

I start with probiotics

I’ve been trying to get on that probiotics game. My girlfriend’s mom is a health teacher, and dietitian, and has suggested that improving my gut health may be a good way to help my body digest foods.

According to our own community, IrritableBowelSyndrome.net, “Probiotics are often used as a treatment for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Probiotics, also called “good bacteria,” are defined as live microorganisms that are similar to the beneficial bacteria found in the human gut. Although the exact cause of IBS is unknown, it is thought to be a combination of factors, with alterations in the muscle movements of the gut, bacterial overgrowth, hypersensitivity, and microscopic inflammation potentially contributing to the condition.”

I mean I don’t have a wild diet, I mainly eat cheese, grains, veggies, and lean meats. I often eat vegetarian options when I can to keep those thick meats out of my system. But wow, It took me an uncomfortable amount of time to parse with the fact that there is good bacteria, let alone good gut bacteria. Here I am trying to fix myself from the outside, blaming foods rather than my own gut composition! I’ve started doing this regimen very recently, so I have no idea how effective this change to my gut health has been.

I should ask my gastroenterologist

Taking a daily supplement, much like painting a wall, is something you don’t realize is done until the end. With each day, I may not feel the immediate results, but by the end, hopefully, I can look and realize that there’s been a difference! It’s a process that requires serious patience. Luckily that’s something I struggle with! Can’t wait to see how improving my body’s own bacterial composition will help manage my IBS.

In Part 2, I dive into my day-to-day dealings with preventive options! What means of relief have you found most helpful? What does your doctor recommend? Would love to know in the comments down below!

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This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The IrritableBowelSyndrome.net team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

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