POC woman surrounded by things she used to love pre-diagnosis.

5 Things I Miss From Life Before IBS

Everyone’s story is different, but in my particular journey, I never had digestive issues in my life until I was diagnosed with IBS and Crohn’s Disease when I was 21 years old. Growing up, I was athletic, strong, and never got sick. I ate well, had healthy bowel movements, and could eat whatever I wanted without any consequence. I never dealt with allergies, food intolerances, or anything of that nature.

Thankful for when symptoms started

So it wasn’t until I was 21 years old that symptoms started to creep in and intensify quickly until I was diagnosed with IBS and Crohn’s Disease. One silver lining in this timing is that I had a healthy and carefree childhood, adolescence, and early adult life. I have met so many others with IBS through social media that have dealt with these awful symptoms from the time they were young. I can’t imagine having IBS while going through school. I don’t think I could have handled it.

I am so thankful that I was able to grow up carefree and without the pain and anxiety of dealing with IBS. I am now 31 and can say the last 10 years have been quite interesting. Many highs and lows and everything in between.

5 things I miss from life before IBS

Recently, turning 31 I couldn’t help but reminisce on my days before IBS and Crohn’s. I think it is normal to go through a mourning process every now and then. Of course, too much isn’t healthy, but at the same time we are human and I don’t have amnesia. I remember very well what it was like to live life without these diagnoses.

Here are a couple of things I really miss:

1. Being spontaneous

I think this might be the thing I miss most. I miss being able to hop in a car with a friend and do a random activity at the drop of a hat. Or I miss getting excited when I would get invited on a trip last minute. Throw some clothes in a bag and off I would go. Anxiety? What’s that? Worrying about a bathroom? That was never even a concern of mine.

Now things have to be more planned out and the spontaneity seems to have been pushed out of my life.

2. Food

I was a total foodie. I could eat anything, at any time and without a care in the world. I loved trying new foods, going out with friends for lunch, meeting a group out for dinner and drinks. I was the girl that indulged in the appetizers at a nice gala. I just loved food and had a very healthy relationship with food.

Unfortunately, now I have many intolerances and food has become a source of stress in my life.

3. Having zero anxiety

I never dealt with anxiety before my diagnosis. I wasn’t a nervous person, nor did I ever overthink. I really was this sort of carefree chic. But now with IBS and Crohn’s, anxiety can hit me hard. If I am in a flare, I am always on edge. Thinking of where the nearest bathroom is. Praying I don’t have an accident while out. Hoping I have enough energy to get through a task. It’s a constant thing whenever I am feeling unwell.

4. Having energy

I used to have so much energy. I was never a napper. I also had very healthy sleeping habits. I would wake up feeling refreshed and ready to take on my day. I was always ready for an adventure. Nowadays I find that I need rest and more rest. Often, when I am flaring I have to cancel plans due to fatigue.

5. Overall health

To sum it all up, I just miss being healthy. Looking back, I wish I could tell my healthy young self how lucky I am. How thankful I should be for having zero health issues. But let’s face it: when you’re young and healthy that isn’t on your radar. You just go about your day preoccupied with the current events. The thought of losing your health is nothing but far-fetched. I guess I just wish I didn’t take it for granted.

How about you? What things do you miss from your life before IBS? Share below, we love to hear from you.

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