Green Bean Egg Salad

While Dr. Seuss may prefer green eggs and ham, this recipe is much tastier! Enjoy this green bean egg salad on its own or as a side dish to your favorite lean protein. While it may be a lengthy lunch process, it's an easy recipe to prep in advance. For instance, roast a batch of potatoes for dinner and a ready-to-use portion for this recipe. Using next-day potatoes also makes the meal higher in resistant starches—a class of carbohydrates that get fermented in the large intestine, shown to have prebiotic properties that promote healthy gut bacteria.1 Then, slice more same-day cooking time to seconds by hard boiling the eggs the day before. Enjoy the eggs as a savory snack and have them ready to use when needed! Talk about mealtime efficiency!

Makes: 4 serving
Serving Size: 1/4 mixture
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 30-35 minutes

Ingredients

  • 5 cups green beans
  • 8 baby Dutch golden potatoes
  • 6 large eggs
  • 2 tbsp plain non-fat Greek yogurt
  • 3 tbsp light mayonnaise
  • 1 tsp white vinegar
  • 1 tbsp Dijon mustard
  • 1 tsp maple syrup
  • 1 tsp Mrs. Dash (or up to a Tbsp per your taste preference)

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. On a baking sheet, roast potatoes until golden brown. Approximately 15 to 20 minutes. Once cooled, cut into quarters. Set aside.
  3. In a cast-iron pan on medium heat, add green beans with 2 tbsp water. Cook until tender, not soft. Approximately 7 minutes.
  4. In a large pot, hard boil eggs to desired doneness. About 6 to 8 minutes. Remove shell and chop. (I like to use an egg chopper and slide vertical then horizontal to get the perfect squares. Set aside.
  5. In a small bowl, add Greek yogurt, mayonnaise, vinegar, Dijon mustard, maple syrup, and Mrs. Dash. Mix until fully incorporated.
  6. In a large bowl, add potatoes and dressing. Mix until combined.
  7. Add eggs to potato mixture. Mix until fully incorporated.
  8. Add green beans to mixture. Toss until combined.
  9. Add salt and pepper per taste
  10. Enjoy!

References:

  1. Raatz, Susan K., et al. “Resistant Starch Analysis of Commonly Consumed Potatoes: Content Varies by Cooking Method and Service Temperature but Not by Variety.” Food Chemistry, vol. 208, 2016, pp. 297–300., doi:10.1016/j.foodchem.2016.03.120.

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Nutrition facts

Per Serving

  • calories: 245kcal
  • carbohydrates: 24g
  • fat: 11g
  • fiber: 6g
  • protein: 14g
  • saturated fat: 3g
  • sodium: 295mg
  • sugar: 4.5g

Disclaimer: We recognize that some ingredients listed in this recipe may be a trigger food for some people. Please feel free to omit or substitute any ingredients that don’t work for you.


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