A woman strapped to an instructor is floating through the air with a parachute past clouds shaped like a GI tract and toilet. She looks alarmed and has a thought bubble coming from her head with an exclamation point in it.

Skydiving with IBS

Have you ever gone skydiving? I highly recommend doing it once in your lifetime. It is an amazing experience and one that you will never ever forget.

I was 26 years old when I decided I wanted to jump out of a plane and free fall from 14,000 feet in the air. Boy was my exit epic. I said to myself, I will never do this again in my life, so let’s make it one to remember.

Getting ready to skydive

As I strapped up to my rad, hippie instructor, Micky, I said: “Micky, I want to make this memorable and epic, so can we do something cool when we jump out of the plane?”  His eyes lit up and he was all for it! He said: “Hell yea!  Want to do a backflip out of the plane?” I yelled: “yes!”

So here we are in this tiny plane at 14,000 feet in the air. The side door opens up and the sound of wind howling becomes deafening. I’m strapped to Micky, he asks if I’m ready, and I give him the thumbs up. We waddle to the opening of the plane, we position ourselves for the flip and with one leap of faith we did exactly as we said we would: we backflipped out into the open air!

Skydiving was exhilarating

The initial feeling of free-falling is a bit intimidating because you get that uncomfortable stomach into throat sensation. But it only lasts about two seconds. Then in a blink of an eye, you suddenly feel like you’re floating in the air. It is the most bizarre and exhilarating feeling. You’re dropping fast and you know you’re falling, yet you feel like your floating because you are falling so fast. It’s insane!

Well, I couldn’t stop smiling throughout the fall. It was a total high and I enjoyed every second. Then the parachute was pulled and before I knew it, we were drifting slowly down onto the earth below us.

The urgency of IBS

Everything was perfect. The wind was blowing in my face gently as we serenely floating down towards our landing when in an instant and with intensity my IBS decided to rear its ugly head.

I’m not sure if it was because of the extreme adrenaline, something I had eaten before, or just bad luck but just as we were about to land, I was clenching like no other! The urge to go was so intense, the cramping was crippling and the anxiety was mounting, as I thought, "where on earth is the nearest bathroom!? I’m about to land in the middle of a field!"

All I remember is plopping down into the grass, Micky unstrapping me, and me immediately saying: “I’m going to be sick. Where is the bathroom.” He pointed to a faraway building in the distance. I bolted and clenched my cheeks like it was no body’s business. It was horrific. I just kept thinking: "Please don’t have an accident, please don’t have an accident. You’re going to be okay. You’re going to be okay."

By the grace of God, I made it to the restroom and completely exploded. And thankfully no one was in the bathroom and it had toilet paper. Total win.

Looking back and laughing

I could not believe that was how I was to end my skydiving rendezvous. Literally running for my life as to not have an accident in the middle of a field! But all I can do is giggle as I reminisce. It makes for one funny story now.

So as a precaution, if anyone with IBS wants to go skydiving, maybe consider wearing some Depends! Just kidding. No, but really, maybe it’s not such a bad idea.

Have you ever done an activity with high adrenaline that sparked your IBS to act up? If so, share below, we love to hear from you!

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