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5 ways to get more probiotics into your day

5 Ways To Get More Probiotics Into Your Day

Probiotic supplements have been shown to help improve IBS symptoms in some people by adding healthy bacteria to the gut, so you may have been told to start consuming probiotics or perhaps you have been told to start out with fermented foods or you just want to give it a go but don’t know where to start.

Your health practitioner will be able to give you specific advice about what probiotic supplements to take as the bacteria strains can be different and the quality of the product can vary.

If you want to try and use food sources to get more helpful bacteria into your day, then try of these (or all of) 5 options. I have got into a routine of adding these foods to my diet and I have found that they have helped to reduce the severity of my IBS symptoms.

It is important to note that fermented foods can affect different people differently, so check in with your health practitioner to see if they are right for you and if you experience any reactions or your IBS symptoms get worse then seek further advice.

Sauerkraut

This traditional way to ferment cabbage has resurfaced as a hip, modern addition to a well-balanced diet. You can make your own a home for the cost of a cabbage and salt or buy it ready made from the refrigerated section of your local grocer or health food store. I love to add a spoonful to my plate of veggies and eggs for breakfast as it adds a little tangy flavor.

Kombucha or Kefir

Kombucha is fermented tea made using a SCOBY (symbiotic colony of bacteria and yeast), and kefir is usually made with milk (goats, sheep, cow, coconut) and kefir grains. Sounds appetizing right?! These drinks actually taste better than they sound and you can buy the readymade product or make your own. I always have a batch of kombucha fermenting in the pantry and a bottle or two of the finished drink in the fridge. A cup a day is all you need and the slightly fizzy, tangy flavor is a nice alternative to a glass of water!

Cashew cheese

Popular in vegan and vegetarian diets, this ‘cream cheese’ is made by fermenting cashew nuts that have been ground into a paste with a few other flavors added. I love it spread on a cracker or with some veggie sticks as a perfect afternoon snack.

Yogurt

Yogurt is a great, simple, easy option to have at breakfast, dessert or as a snack. You can also look out for yogurt made with coconut milk for a dairy-free alternative. I always try and check the ingredients on the pack as a lot of commercial yogurts can have a lot of added sugar, and if you can find a variety with no sugar and as natural as can be, then just serve it with fruit for some added sweetness.

Pickled vegetables

Vegetables that have been fermented in a jar, can make a great addition to a platter of snacks or in a salad. You can also try your hand at making your own at home with those leftover veggies that were heading for the bin! It’s important to make sure you are buying brands that specify that they have live cultures as a lot of them are pasteurized which destroys all the bacteria, even the helpful bacteria.

So good luck adding a few more fermented foods into your day. Once you get started and become familiar with the different tastes, you might just find that they really are a great cost effective, and tasty way, to help reduce your IBS symptoms.

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The IrritableBowelSyndrome.net team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

Comments

  • pstrick
    1 year ago

    This doesn’t make sense!! Kefir, yogurt and cashews all are listed as high FODMAPS

  • Hannah Noonan moderator author
    1 year ago

    Hi @pstrick thanks for your comment! This article wasn’t specifically aimed at those people on the low FODMAP diet. But if you do have trouble with high FODMAP foods then you could try goats milk, lactose free or coconut yogurt.

    Cashew cheese hasn’t been tested for its FODMAP content yet but as activated cashews are low FODMAP at 10 nuts then small servings of cashew cheese may be ok due to the soaking/fermenting process.

    Kombucha is ok at 1 teacup and whilst milk kefir may be high FODMAP due to the lactose, water kefir hasn’t been tested yet.

    Of course everyone’s tolerance may be different so it may be helpful to work with an experienced dietitian/nutritionist – Hannah (IrritableBowelSyndrome.net Team)

  • DorisE
    1 year ago

    Good article, but no attending physician has ever suggested to me which probiotic would be best, nor diet, nada! But they love to prescribe pillsI I am unsure what you mean by using up older veggies.. pickle them? Would this be for ibs d or c? Thanks.

  • Hannah Noonan moderator author
    1 year ago

    Hi @dorise Apologies for the late reply! Yes you can definitely use fresh, or on their way out, vegetables for fermenting/pickling. It’s always a good idea to gradually test them out to see how you react and if you like them! – Hannah (IrritableBowelSyndrome.net Team)

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